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JAUNTY
The traditional nickname for the Master-At-Arms, the chief of the ship's
police. At the end of the XVII century the Master-At-Arms was the Small Arms
Instructor and also responsible for the minor organisation of the ship's
company; he lost this latter responsibility when Commander's Offices were
introduced in about 1926. The name "Master-At-Arms" first appears in about
1860. The name "Jaunty" is said to be a corruption of the French GENDARME,
which, aglicised, became JOHN DAMME.


JAWBATION
An old naval slang word for a reprimand, a telling off.


JEW
JEWING
Naval nickname for tailoring. This may have originated from the fact that
tailoring is a popular profession among Jews, or "J" was substituted for "S".


JEWING FIRM
A sailor on board whom in his spare time does tailoring for others.


JEWING BAG or BUNDLE
The bag in which a sailor keeps his sewing gear.


JIB
CUT OF HIS JIB
A maritime phrase descriptive of a person's facial appearance. It comes from
the days of sail when a ship's nationality could be told at a distance by the
cut of her sails.


JIMMY
JIMMY-THE-ONE
Naval nickname for the First Lieutenant of a ship. In the early days he was
referred to as the "First Luff". Usually nowadays abbreviated to JIMMY and
known as NUMBER ONE.


JOEY
One of the many common nicknames for the Marines when used in the plural: in
the singular it now usually refers to the Marine Officer. The name as applied
to the Marines is said to be a corruption of JOSEPH - from the Joseph of the
Old Testament, not an account of his coat of many colours but for his all-
round efficiency.


JOLLY
H M JOLLIES
Another general nickname for the Marines.


JOSSMAN
A modern corruption of JAUNTY (qv).


JUDAS
HANGING JUDAS
Said of a rope when insecurely made fast or belayed, i.e. false and
unreliable as was Judas.


JUNK
The name is derived from a species of bulrush of which ropes were formerly
made. It this affords a practical view of the old sailor's opinion of the
quality of his rations! Condemned rope is cut into short pieces and offered
for sale as "Junk".


JURY
As an adjective, this prefix means "temporary" - e.g. Jury-mast.

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